Tag Archives: House of Representatives

LCA Urges Senate to Reject Bill to Make Register of Copyrights a Presidential Appointee

On April 26, 2017, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass H.R. 1695, the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act of 2017, a bill to make the Register of Copyrights a presidential appointee rather than an appointee of the Librarian of Congress.  The House disappointingly voted in favor of the bill by a 378-48 margin. The bill also included two amendments including one that specifies that nothing in the bill will impact mandatory deposit.

The Library Copyright Alliance issued the following statement:

The Library Copyright Alliance is disappointed that the House today passed H.R. 1695, the Register of Copyrights Selection and Accountability Act. We continue to believe that the bill will delay critically needed modernization of the Copyright Office and make the Register of Copyrights less accountable to Congress and the public, contrary to the stated intent of the bill made plain in its title. We look forward to working with the Senate on this legislation.

 

ARL Joins Coalition Asking House Appropriations Committee to Oppose Portions of Bill Threatening Implementation of Net Neutrality

On June 16, 2015, ARL joined a coalition of 64 public interest groups, civil rights and social justice organizations, and companies to oppose the portions of a House Appropriations bill that would threaten implementation of the FCC’s Open Internet Order, rules governing net neutrality that went into effect on June 12th.  Last week, a House Appropriations subcommittee voted in favor of the bill which includes provisions that would prevent the FCC from enforcing its Order until after litigation over the rules has ended and the full committee is expected to take up the bill this week.

The letter discusses the importance of net neutrality and cites the strong support for an open Internet.  It calls for the removal of provisions that would prevent enforcement of the FCC’s net neutrality rules, explaining:

These sections would gut the Open Internet Order, leaving the American people and economy vulnerable to blocking, discrimination, and other unreasonable practices of gatekeeper broadband providers.  These measures, buried in a spending bill that is 150 pages long, constitute a direct rebuke to the millions of people that asked for strong Net Neutrality rules.  By eliminating the FCC’s ability to protect Net Neutrality, this appropriations bill would have a chilling effect on our First Amendment rights and our economy.

 

 

House of Representatives Passes USA FREEDOM Act; Senate To Act Quickly

On Wednesday, May 13, 2015, the U.S. House of Representatives voted in favor of the USA FREEDOM Act, legislation that bans bulk collection under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act as well as other authorities, such as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) pen/trap statute and national security letters (NSL) by an overwhelming majority of 338 to 88. ARL is pleased that the House of Representatives has passed stronger reform than its 2014 version and considers this development a step forward in surveillance reform.

Since 2006, the National Security Agency (NSA) has engaged in the practice of bulk collection of phone records under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, also known as the “library records” or “business records” provision. The 2015 USA FREEDOM Act, backed by the White House, specifically addresses this issue and prohibits bulk collection, only permitting limited surveillance orders that focus on a specific selection term. The Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit also addressed this issue recently, ruling that the NSA’s practice of bulk collection exceeded the authority under Section 215 and therefore unlawful.

The 2015 version of the USA FREEDOM Act passed by the U.S. House of Representatives also includes several amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) and transparency measures, representing an improvement over the version passed during the last Congress. The bill will now go to the Senate and must be considered quickly, given the upcoming expiration date of certain provisions of the PATRIOT Act, including Section 215.

While the version passed today by the House of Representatives includes better reforms to surveillance practices than in the 2014 bill, the USA FREEDOM Act is just one step forward in a series of necessary reforms. The Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit’s recent unanimous decision that the NSA’s bulk collection practices exceeded the scope of authority granted under Section 215 demonstrates the egregiousness of the NSA’s interpretation of its authority and the willingness of FISC to approve such broad application of the law. Congress should take care to ensure that provisions under USA FREEDOM Act are not similarly interpreted in an overly-broad manner by the NSA to infringe on the privacy rights of those in the United States. ARL looks forward to continuing to work with Congress to ensure that privacy rights are respected and hopes that additional reforms will be made.