Tag Archives: fairuseweek2017

Roundup From Day 2 of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017

*Cross-posted from Fair Use Week*

Check out all the great posts from Day 2 of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017! Don’t see yours? Contact us to get yours added! You can view previous roundups here.

Podcasts

Re:Create Copy This Podcast Episode 4: Fair Use: You Use It More Than You Realize with Corynne McSherry (EFF)

Videos

CMSi, Fair Use Video Code: Documentary Filmmakers’ Statement of Best Practices

Blog Posts

Authors Alliance,Fair Use Week: Our Best Practices Guide is Underway

Jonathan Band on ARL Policy Notes Blog,Copyright Notice and Fair Use

Brandon Butler on Copyright at Harvard University Blog,Fair Use and Open Access: Two Great Tastes That Taste Great Together

Canadian Association of Research Libraries,CARL Statement in support of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017

Melanie Clark on Visual Resources Association Blog,Fair Use Week: Image Sources

EDUCAUSE,Fair Use

Ellen Euler, Anne Klammt und Oliver Rack on Deutsch Digitale Bibliothek,Bereit zu teilen?” (translation: “Ready to Share?”)

David Hansen on Scholarly Communications @Duke,Fair Use For Authors

Brandy Karl on Penn State Copyright Portal,Penn State Celebrates Fair Use Week 2017 #WeAreFairUse

Brandy Karl on Penn State Copyright Portal,Fair Use Myths & Facts #WeAreFairUse

Joshua Lamel,Fair Use: You Use It More Than You Realize

Mayra Linares on CMSi,How to Use Copyrighted Material in Your Work: Fair Use Week

Jeremy Malcolm, Electronic Frontier Foundation,Australia’s Battle Over Fair Use Boils Over

Jim Neal in The Hill,Balance is Everything

Stakebait on Archive of Our Own, “In Defense of Fanfiction (a sonnet to Fair Use)

Rebecca Reznik-Zellen on LSL Now,Fair Use Week 2017

Adrian Sheppard on The QUAD Where UAlberta Meets Online,The Importance of Fair Dealing

Copyright Notice and Fair Use

This week is Fair Use Week, an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use and fair dealing. It is designed to highlight and promote the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, celebrate successful stories, and explain these doctrines.

*This is a guest blog post by Jonathan Band, policybandwidth*

The absence of a copyright notice on content posted by its author on the Internet should weigh in favor of fair use of that content, by libraries and other users, under the second fair use factor.

Until the United States joined the Berne Convention in 1989, a work could fall into the public domain if it was published without a copyright notice. The notice had to include the copyright symbol, the name of the copyright owner, and the year of first publication. The Berne Convention prohibits “formalities” as a condition for protection, so once the United States joined the Berne Convention, it eliminated the notice requirement.

However, the Copyright Act still provides an incentive for including a copyright notice. Under 17 U.S.C. § 401(d), if a copyright owner applies a copyright notice to his work, no evidentiary weight may be given to a defendant’s claim that he is an innocent infringer in mitigation of damages. In other words, if the copyright owner applied a notice, a defendant can’t claim the infringement was innocent because he or she “was not aware, and had no reason to believe, that his or her acts constituted an infringement….” This means that the defendant can’t seek reduction of the statutory damages minimum from $750 to $200 per work infringed.

The Copyright Act does not set forth what impact copyright notice should have on the fair use analysis. Nor, as far as I am aware, does the fair use case law. But a powerful argument can be made that the absence of a copyright notice should weigh in favor of fair use under the second fair use factor.

The second fair use factor—the nature of the copyrighted work—receives little attention by courts. They typically ask whether the work is published or unpublished, and whether it is a work of fact or fiction. Robert Kasunic has argued that courts should take a more nuanced view of the second factor. In particular, Kasunic contends that the second factor should be understood to ask “whether copyright might have reasonably encouraged or provided an incentive for an author to create the work.” Kasunic adds that “once we understand the work and the reasonable and customary expectations of authors for that type of material, we can better understand how various uses might affect the incentive to create such works.” Significantly, the starting point for Kasunic’s analysis is Judge Leval’s famous law review article Toward a Fair Use Standard. With respect to the second factor, Kasunic explains that Judge Leval “recognized the need to distinguish between authors of works for whom copyright provided an incentive to create and those authors who were incidental beneficiaries of copyright.”

It is hard to imagine a clearer indication of an author’s expectations concerning her work—whether she intends to use copyright to control subsequent uses of her work or instead is an “incidental beneficiary” of copyright—than whether she attached a copyright notice when she published it. In many situations, a user could reasonably assume that by omitting notice, the author was signaling that she did not expect to rely on copyright to control reproduction and distribution of the work. In such situations, the author’s failure to place a notice on the work should weigh in favor of fair use under the second factor.

What are these situations? Daily, millions of photographs, videos, blogs, songs and other works are posted on the Internet. Many (if not most) of these works are posted without copyright notice. The terms of service of large social media platforms such as Facebook specify that users agree that everyone may use their content published on the platform. But vast quantities of content are posted on other websites that do not have such terms of service. People repost these works without requesting the author’s permission and without incurring the author’s opposition.

In the event the author of such a work did challenge a reuse, fair use is the legal theory that would best support the lawfulness of the reuse. And the absence of copyright notice should buttress the fair use calculus under the second factor. A user could reasonably interpret the absence of notice as a signal that the author did not expect to rely on copyright to control the reproduction and distribution of the work—that the author is just an incidental beneficiary of copyright. Of course, this is just one element of one factor, and would not be dispositive of the fair use question. And if there were indicia that the work was posted on the website without the author’s authorization, then the absence of notice should have no weight.

Factoring the absence of notice into the fair use calculus could be of particular importance to libraries interested in harvesting content posted on websites. Although the existing fair use case law is very strong for the preservation of this content and its inclusion in search databases, the jurisprudence is less developed with respect to providing access to full text or full-sized images. The argument that the author’s failure to include notice tilts the second factor in favor of a fair use determination should give libraries additional comfort as they decide what to do with web content they have collected.

ARL Files Amicus Brief in Capitol Records v. ReDigi

This week is Fair Use Week, an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use and fair dealing. It is designed to highlight and promote the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, celebrate successful stories, and explain these doctrines.

The start of Fair Use/Fair Dealing week, which runs from February 20-24, 2017, immediately follows a week in which ARL filed amicus briefs along with other library associations and organizations in two fair use cases. The first case, ARL joined the American Library Association (ALA), Association for College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) in filing a brief in the Georgia State e-reserves case which is again before the Eleventh Circuit. In the second case, ARL joined ALA, ACRL and the Internet Archive in filing an amicus brief in Capitol Records v. ReDigi, currently before the Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, arguing that other existing limitations and exceptions can tilt the first fair use factor (character of the use) in favor of the user and that fair use encourages innovative services.

In the summary of the argument, the brief notes:

First, in its truncated fair use analysis, the district court ignored the similarity between the use ReDigi sought to make and uses authorized by Section 109(a). This similarity should have tilted the first fair use factor, the purpose and character of the use, in favor of ReDigi. In Authors Guild v. HathiTrust, 755 F.3d 87, 102 (2d Cir. 2014), this Court used the rationale for a specific exception—17 U.S.C. § 121, which permits the making of accessible format copies for people who have print disablilites—to support a finding of a valid purpose under the first factor. Likewise, the Copyright Office has repeatedly based fair use conclusions on specific exceptions in the context of a rulemaking under section 1201 of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. § 1201. As this Court did in HathiTrust and the Copyright Office did in the section 1201 rulemaking, the district court should have recognized that the purpose behind the first sale right tilted the first fair use factor in favor of ReDigi.

Second, the brief argues that a positive fair use determination in this case would encourage libraries to provide innovative services to their users. Fair use findings in technology cases have permitted libraries to provide new, digitally-based services such as HathiTrust Digital Library. In addition to enabling researchers to find relevant texts and perform critical data mining, HathiTrust provides full-text access to over fourteen million volumes to people who have print disabilities. A fair use finding in this case would provide libraries with additional legal certainty to roll out innovative services such as the Internet Archive’s Open Library. Such a result would increase users’ access to important content without diminishing authors’ incentive to create new works.

The full brief can be read here.

 

Happy Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017!

This week is Fair Use Week, an annual celebration of the important doctrines of fair use and fair dealing. It is designed to highlight and promote the opportunities presented by fair use and fair dealing, celebrate successful stories, and explain these doctrines.

Today marks the start of Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week 2017!

Fair use and fair dealing are essential limitations and exceptions to copyright, allowing the use of copyrighted materials without permission from the copyright holder under certain circumstances. Fair use and fair dealing are flexible doctrines, allowing copyright to adapt to new technologies. These doctrines facilitate balance in copyright law, promoting further progress and accommodating freedom of speech and expression.

While fair use and fair dealing is employed on a daily basis by students, faculty, librarians, journalists, and all users of copyrighted material, Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is a time to promote and discuss the opportunities presented, celebrate successful stories and explain the doctrine.

The level of participation in Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week is entirely up to each participant. Some will publish a blog post on fair use on one day during the week, while others might host events each day of the week. Below are some examples of ways to participate in Fair Use Week:

  • Write a blog post on fair use/dealing.
  • Publish an op-ed.
  • Host a live panel on fair use/dealing at your campus, institution, or organization.
  • Host a webcast or webinar.
  • Create a video about fair use/dealing.
  • Publicize fair use/fair dealing on social media using the hashtag #fairuseweek2016.
    (On Twitter, you can also follow and tag @fairuseweek.)
  • Write to your member of Congress highlighting the importance of fair use and how you, your members, or institution/organization rely on fair use.
  • Create resources or share existing resources. (See http://fairuseweek.org/resources/ for a great collection of resources developed during last year’s Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week celebration.)

To find out more, get resources, post news items or see a calendar of events for the week, please visit the Fair Use/Fair Dealing Week website.