Tag Archives: advocacy and policy update

New Advocacy and Policy Update Available

The latest ARL Advocacy and Policy Update (covering mid-August to the beginning of October) is now available.  Previous Advocacy and Policy Updates can be found here.

From the current update’s summary:

With its return from an August recess, the US Congress faces several controversial must-pass bills and other divisive issues with little time to spare prior to the passage of a short-term funding measure for the US Government as the Government’s fiscal year ended on September 30. A short-term funding bill that will fund the Government through mid-December was approved in lieu of another Government shutdown.

The US Senate continues to press ahead for passage of the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), a bill to codify the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s 2013 memorandum regarding public access to federally funded research.

The White House is building a pool of prospective candidates for the Librarian of Congress position. With James Billington’s retirement at the end of September, the White House has been reaching out to stakeholders, including ARL, for their input and recommendations. Legislation has been introduced in the Senate to limit the term of the Librarian of Congress to 10 years.

Copyright has been an active area over the past six weeks. Members of the House Judiciary Committee are poised to introduce several bills regarding the future of the US Copyright Office— determining the office’s authority and whether it will remain in the Library of Congress. This may be the first issue that the House considers as it continues its review of the Copyright Act for possible reform. A court ruled that Warner/Chappell Music does not hold a valid copyright to the “Happy Birthday” song lyrics, and there were two positive fair use decisions in Lenz v. Universal and Katz v. Google. The Library Copyright Alliance filed comments on the Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry on Extended Collective Licensing, and the 1201 Digital Millennium Copyright Act rulemaking is still underway.

ARL participated in a number of amicus briefs on a variety of issues. ARL, the American Library Association, Association of College and Research Libraries, and Chief Officers of State Library Agencies filed an amicus brief in support of the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Order protecting network neutrality. ARL also joined in an amicus brief in the case Wikimedia v. National Security Agency (NSA), challenging warrantless surveillance and invoking the First Amendment’s protection of privacy.

Congress continues to consider reform of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, or ECPA and there is widespread support in the House for such reform.

The US Supreme Court has agreed to rehear Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, a case involving the University of Texas (UT) admissions process, which seeks to improve student body diversity.

On the international front, several additional countries have ratified the Marrakesh Treaty to Facilitate Access to Published Works for Persons Who Are Blind, Visually Impaired, or Otherwise Print Disabled, with Canada moving closer to ratification of the treaty. Another meeting took place in late September–early October to finalize the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, a large, regional, trade agreement among 12 countries including Canada and the US. Finally, the “right to be forgotten” online has been upheld in Europe, and French regulators declared that search engines must apply the right to be forgotten across all domains, not just in France or Europe.

New Advocacy and Policy Update: August 14, 2015

A new ARL Advocacy and Policy Update, covering mid-June to mid-August is now available here.  Prior updates can be accessed here.

The summary and contents from the current Advocacy and Policy Update are reproduced below:

Summary

The US House of Representatives began the summer recess on July 30th, and the US Senate adjourned on August 6th with both reconvening on September 8th. September and October promise to be very busy months as both chambers must act on the FY 2017 appropriations bills, highway trust fund, debt ceiling, and many other issues. It is also hoped that there will be a deal to increase the spending limits under sequestration, which higher education institutions and others have long advocated for.

Much of the activity related to copyright has centered around the Copyright Office. Congressional offices continue to explore and discuss ways to modernize the Copyright Office, including various proposals to move the Copyright Office out of the Library of Congress. Additionally, the Copyright Office has issued notices of inquiries that relate to orphan works, mass digitization, visual works, and extended collective licensing.

There have been positive developments with respect to open access, open educational resources, and open data. The Obama Administration released science and technology priorities for FY 2017, which note that “preserving and improving access to scientific collections, research data, other results of federally funded research, open datasets and open education resources should be a priority for agencies.” The FASTR Bill to enhance public access to research was approved unanimously by the US Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

Privacy and surveillance concerns continue as Congress is considering cybersecurity legislation that raises serious issues for privacy and civil liberties. Litigation around net neutrality is in full swing, with the briefs of telecommunications companies opposing the FCC’s net neutrality rules filed in July.

Finally, ARL continues to promote a simple and quick ratification of the Marrakesh Treaty. Currently, 10 countries have ratified the Treaty, and 10 more are needed for it to enter into force.

Contents

Copyright and Intellectual Property

  • Proposal to “Modernize” the Copyright Office
  • Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry on Visual Works
  • Copyright Office Notice of Inquiry on Mass Digitization and Extended Collective Licensing
  • House Judiciary Committee’s Copyright Review

Open Access, Open Educational Resources, and Open Data

  • Obama Administration Releases Science and Technological Priorities for FY 2017
  • Coalition Calls on White House to Open Up Access to Federally Funded Educational Resources
  • FASTR Bill to Enhance Public Access to Research Approved by US Senate Committee
  • National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Update Appropriations

Draft Bill Would Eliminate NHPRC

Privacy and Surveillance

  • Cybersecurity Legislation
  • Electronic Communications Privacy Act Reform

Telecommunications

  • Net Neutrality Litigation

International Treaties

  • Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement
  • Marrakesh Treaty