Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) Filibusters USA FREEDOM Act; Future of Section 215 Uncertain

On Wednesday, May 20, 2015, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) took the Senate floor to filibuster the USA FREEDOM Act.  While the Senate was considering a bill on trade promotion authority or “fast track” legislation, Senator Paul’s filibuster was intended to stall consideration of a vote of the USA FREEDOM Act.  Senate procedural rules mean that the Senate would not be able to take a procedural vote on the USA FREEDOM Act or Senator McConnell’s bill to allow clean reauthorization of Section 215 until at least Saturday, unless there is an agreement to shorten the addition 30 hours of debate permitted.

Senator Paul has been a sharp critic of government surveillance, including under Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act which is also known as the “library records” or “business records” provision.   This provision has been relied upon by the National Security Agency (NSA) to engage in bulk collection of telephone metadata, though the Second Circuit recently ruled that such bulk collection was unlawful under Section 215.  While the USA FREEDOM Act provides for new safeguards, Senator Paul has opposed the extension of Section 215 and other provisions of the PATRIOT Act.  Although he opposes the current text of the USA FREEDOM Act, Paul has announced his intention to offer several amendments to the legislation.

Senator Paul’s filibuster was supported by Senators Daines (R-MT), Lee (R-UT), Heinrich (D-NM), Coons (D-DE), Tester (D-MT), Cantwell (D-WA), Blumenthal (D-CT), Wyden (D-OR) and Manchin (D-WV).

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Image: Word Cloud of Senator Paul’s Filibuster of USA FREEDOM Act, Joseph Hall (CC-BY)

Additionally, while Senator McConnell has now filed motions to proceed on the USA FREEDOM Act and his reauthorization bill, both would still need to clear the hurdle of 60 votes for cloture.  It is not clear whether there are enough votes for either bill.  While there have been suggestions that Congress could pass a very short-term reauthorization — for example, a two-moth reauthorization — to provide time to forge compromise legislation, the House may not be able to consider such legislation before the June 1 sunset.  There is, therefore, a possibility that Section 215 of the PATRIOT Act might sunset, which could greatly change the dynamic of the discussions on surveillance reform.  Should Section 215 sunset, any reform legislation would essentially be seen as granting or reinstating authorization for surveillance under this provision once again rather than simply extending existing authorities, thus changing the political dynamic and potentially creating a basis for stronger reform to protect privacy and civil liberties.

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